Washington State Retail: Who’s Open, When, and Where 8/29/2014

Research by Danny Hackin and Dominic Corva

Tradename StreetAddress City County DayPhone Hours of Operation
2020 SOLUTIONS 2018 IRON ST STE A BELLINGHAM WHATCOM 3603938697 M-F 9-9, Sa 9-7, Su 11-6
420 CARPENTER 422 CARPENTER RD STE 105 LACEY THURSTON 3604026368 Su-Sa 11-8
4US RETAIL 23251 HWY 20 OKANOGAN OKANOGAN 3602240978 M-Sa 10-7
ALTITUDE 260 MERLOT DR PROSSER BENTON 5097864200 M-Th 2:30-6:30, F 1-8, Sa 11-7, Su 1-5
AUSTIN LOTT 29 HORIZON FLATS RD STE 8 WINTHROP OKANOGAN 5094295556 M-Su 10-6
BUD HUT 1123 E STATE ROUTE 532 CAMANO ISLAND ISLAND 3606293480 Su-Sa 10-10
CANNABIS CITY 2733 4TH AVE S 1st Floor Unit SEATTLE KING 2066821332 M-Su 12-8
CASCADE KROPZ 19129 SMOKEY POINT BLVD STE B ARLINGTON SNOHOMISH 3606595422 M-Sa 10-8
CREATIVE RETAIL MANAGEMENT 7046 PACIFIC AVE TACOMA PIERCE 2536917293 M-Su 10-10
FREEDOM MARKET 820A WESTSIDE HWY KELSO COWLITZ 3603550682 M-Su 9-12pm
GREEN STAR CANNABIS 1403 N DIVISION ST STE A SPOKANE SPOKANE 5099193398 M-Th 10-10, F-Sat 10-12, Su 10-6
GREEN THEORY 10697 MAIN ST STE B BELLEVUE KING 4255027033 9/1/2014
MAIN STREET MARIJUANA 2314 MAIN ST VANCOUVER CLARK 4259745804 M-Th 11-7, F-Sa 11-8, Su 11-6
MARGIE’S POT SHOP 405 E STUEBEN BINGEN KLICKITAT 5094930441 Su-Sa 10-7
NEW VANSTERDAM 6515 E MILL PLAIN BLVD VANCOUVER CLARK 3605974739 Su-Th 11-9, F-Sa 11-10
SATORI 9301 N DIVISION ST STE B-C SPOKANE SPOKANE 5099947051 Su-Th 11-7, F-Sa 11-9
SPACE 3111 S PINE ST TACOMA PIERCE 2066508908 M-Su 10-10
SPOKANE GREEN LEAF 9107 N COUNTRY HOMES BLVD STEB SPOKANE SPOKANE 5099193467 M-Sa 10-8:30, Su 10-7
THE HAPPY CROP SHOPPE 50 ROCK ISLAND RD EAST WENATCHEE DOUGLAS 5098881597 M-Th 12-7, F-Sa 12-8
TOP SHELF CANNABIS 3863 HANNEGAN RD BELLINGHAM WHATCOM 3602243735 M-Th 10-8, F-Sa 10-10
VERDE VALLEY RETAIL SALES 4007 MAIN ST UNION GAP YAKIMA 5094203430 M-Su 10-10
WESTSIDE420 RECREATIONAL 4503 OCEAN BEACH HWY STE 103 LONGVIEW COWLITZ 3604235261 Th-Su 10-8
WHIDBEY ISLAND CANNABIS COMPANY 5826 S KRAMER RD STE A AND D LANGLEY ISLAND 3603216151 M-Su 10-10
GREENSIDE 10600 MAIN ST BELLEVUE KING 2069103811 M-F 10-9, Sa-Su 10-7
MILL CREEK NATURAL FOODS 4315 MAIN ST STE A UNION GAP YAKIMA 5098400186 M-Sa 12-5
HERBAL NATION 19302 BOTHELL EVERETT HWY BOTHELL SNOHOMISH 4254852535 M-Th 10-10, F-Sa 10-12pm, Su 10-6
SEA CHANGE CANNABIS 282332 HIGHWAY 101 STE 2 PORT TOWNSEND JEFFERSON 2064228328 M-Su 10-8
CROCKPOT 1703 SE SEDGWICK RD STE 113 PORT ORCHARD KITSAP 2533127280 Tu-Su 9-9
CASCADE HERB COMPANY 1240 E MAPLE ST STE 103 BELLINGHAM WHATCOM 9082856086 M-Su 9-8
420 HOLIDAY 2028 10TH AVE LONGVIEW COWLITZ 5093030681 9/1/2014
ELLENSBURG APOTHECARY 1516 WEST UNIVERSITY WAY ELLENSBURG KITTITAS 5098335556 M-Sa 10-6
GREEN COLLAR 10422 PACIFIC AVE S STE B TACOMA PIERCE 2532670675 M-Su 10-10
CLEAR CHOICE CANNABIS 8001 S HOSMER ST TACOMA PIERCE 2534445444 M-Sa 10-7, Su 12-6
GREEN STOP 7466 MT BAKER HWY MAPLE FALLS WHATCOM 3603937702 Not Yet
HERBAL ACCESS RETAIL 661 NESS’ CORNER RD PORT HADLOCK JEFFERSON 3602977996 Not Yet
221 18729 FIR ISLAND RD STE C MOUNT VERNON SKAGIT 3604454221 M-Sa 10-8, Su 10-6
GREEN LADY 3044 PACIFIC AVE SE STE B OLYMPIA THURSTON 5098697574 M-Sa 10-8, Su 11-7
MARIJUANA MART 1405 YELM AVE E YELM THURSTON 3604801912 October
SAVAGE THC 4428 WILLIAMS VALLEY RD STE A CLAYTON STEVENS 5099992989 Tu-Su 12-8
GREEN LEAF 4220 MERIDIAN ST STE 102 BELLINGHAM WHATCOM 3603032860 M-Su 9-9
TOKEN HERB 837 A CRESCENT BEACH RD EASTSOUND SAN JUAN 3603766900 Not Yet
HIGH SOCIETY 1824 BROADWAY EVERETT SNOHOMISH 2063071651 9/15/14 (Hopefully)
LOVING FARMS 2615 OLD HIGHWAY 99 S MOUNT VERNON SKAGIT 3605405168 October
SMUGGLER BROTHERS 1912 STATE ROUTE 20 SEDRO WOOLLEY SKAGIT 3606473437 Late September/Mid October
CANNARAIL STATION 1448 BASIN ST NW SUITE A EPHRATA GRANT 5097541047 Su-Sa 10-10
SPOKANE’S GREEN DEPOT 71 N RALPH ST STE 102 SPOKANE SPOKANE 2532417773 Not Yet
CANNABLYSS 2705 HARTFORD DR STE A LAKE STEVENS SNOHOMISH 4253277529 Not Yet
SATIVA SISTERS 10525 E TRENT AVE STE 1 SPOKANE SPOKANE 2086603909 M-Su 12-9
I-502 CANNABIS STORE 3012 GS CENTER RD STE A WENATCHEE CHELAN 2817260614 Not Yet
THE GREEN SEED 8420 ASPI BLVD STE 3 MOSES LAKE GRANT 5098552271 Not Yet

 

 

August I-502 Legal Production Update and Analysis

08232014 map

Map by Steve Hyde

Additional research provided by Danny Hackin

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

*This late-August update uses the 8/19 Washington State Liquor Control Board list of “Marijuana License Applicants.”

The purpose of this post is to extrapolate from the most current data in order to map the legal cannabis production landscape and identify the scope and rate of active production for the I-502 market. ¬†The map above shows you how the landscape is filling in by Tier, and differentiates “Active” from “Approved” producers by allowing for a 10 week lag between approval and approximate expected production. ¬†The 10 weeks are a “rule of thumb” estimation rather than derived from any particular assessment for each producer. ¬†We’ll start with a table that shows our estimation of Active max square feet of canopy by Tier, next to pending production, approved less than 10 weeks ago, next to the total Approved which should be Active around 10/24/2014.

Max Sq ft Canopy Active 8/24 Approved not Active yet Total Approved
Tier 1 23800 19600 43400
Tier 2 259000 280000 539000
Tier 3 378000 903000 1281000
All Tiers 660800 1202600 1863400

We have a maximum¬†of 1,863,400 square feet of approved canopy, but only about a third of that should be considered active. ¬†This means that in the next two months, we expect active production to increase by about 282% . ¬†Most of that will be from Tier 3 producers, of which 18 out of 61 are currently active. The ratio of Tier 1:Tier 2:Tier 3 approval until two months ago was 17:37:18. ¬†Since then it is 14:40:43. ¬†Either the WSLCB is focusing on Tier 3 approval more or Tier 3′s are finding an easier path to approval for other reasons. ¬†The upshot of this is that a LOT more canopy is being approved at a faster rate. ¬†We can see this in the following two trend charts, trajectory of approved canopy and trajectory of active canopy.

This time we are pleased to supplement the map with a range of graphs to help policymakers and the public understand the rate of expected canopy activation rather than simply producer activation, and to project currently approved canopy to its expected dates of activation, once again by adding 10 weeks to individual approval dates.  Then, we will look at what that means in terms of market share among the Tiers.

AggregateActive AggregateApproved

*Pardon the charts, I had a problem exporting from googledocs to wordpress so I took screenshots*

The above charts help us understand how the rate of approval is a bit misleading: instead we want to add 2 months to the approval date to get approximate activation dates.  We expect the Aggregate Active Max Canopy on October 18th to match up with the Aggregate Approved Max Canopy on August 18th, more or less the latest entry in the WSLCB updates.

The reader can also see that the process is¬†gaining momentum — certainly not a characteristic of a process that is “failing” in any way.What we see above is a logarithmic expansion that really takes off the beginning of June, when the first retail stores opened. ¬†This was to be expected, given the WSLCB shifted resources to getting retail off the ground. ¬†Now they are turning their limited human resources¬†back to producer/processor approvals, perhaps especially focused on Tier 3s per the reasoning above.

The information provided also gives us a picture of market share by Tier, right now and two months from now.

8_24 Active Canopy 10_24Projected

Tier 3 Canopy is on its way to swallowing up market share, confirming CASP’s earlier statements that now is the best time for smaller producers to position themselves in the market, and to plan for substantial supply increases which will drive wholesale prices down. ¬†This is a major reason why current active producers have a slightly different idea of what constitutes fair wholesale market pricing, compared with retailers. ¬†One way they are resolving this tension is by establishing long term contracts at below-current market prices.

In the medium term, however, this analysis of production trends should be coupled with an analysis of retail store trends. ¬†Wholesale “supply” is a function of retail demand, not consumer demand. ¬†Retail demand will be increasing over time, though we are not sure at what rate right now. ¬†So increased production won’t necessarily drive prices down — that depends on the rate of increased retail outlets. ¬†Currently 46 retailers have been approved, and only some of these are open, and only a handful are able to stay open without running out of product. ¬†With over 330 potential retail outlets under the current rules,¬†we can’t confidently estimate when retail prices will come down. ¬†We can, however, suggest that supply is increasing at a logarithmic rate; that October is non-indoor harvest time; and that 43 Tier 3′s are ramping up to harvest as we speak.

There is so much more to discover before we can really predict anything sophisticated about prices and supply.  My preliminary research suggests that most indoor producers are operating between 30-50% canopy, while greenhouse and full sun are closer in general to their maximum canopy.  For now, I would note that non-indoor spatial logic is mostly seasonal, while indoor spatial logic is mostly not.

We also need to know more about cycle variability, especially indoor.  Many indoor producers are staggering production so that they harvest more regularly than the 4-5 cycles upon which WSLCB rules are predicated.  They are trading flowering canopy space for steady revenue, so that affects how much becomes available for wholesale at any given time.

Finally, we would be remiss not to point out how far ahead Spokane and Okanagon seem to be in terms of approved producers (see intro map above). ¬†Part of it might be the afrementioned possible focus on approving Tier 3′s right now, but it also may be the effect of organizing by potential I-502 producers to prepare their jurisdictions for a smoother transition.

We look forward to discovering so much more, and adjusting our analyses accordingly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CannaCon

Cannacon

photo by twicebaked in Washington

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

I have to admit, my seminar talk at CannaCon the day before Hempfest began didn’t really excite me. ¬†I wasn’t sure who my audience was there, and after a bit of confusion around what exactly it was I planned on talking about (sourcing cannabis agriculture, not “managing your inventory”) I was not at all sure I belonged there. ¬†Strangely enough, it was the most engaged audience I’ve ever had outside of a classroom. ¬†Pam from twicebaked took this shot before the seats filled in, but I wish she could have snapped what happened at the end of the talk when a dozen people came up to tell me how useful it was for them. ¬†It turns out the audience was full of I-502 retailers, producers, and processors trying to figure out what’s going on.

So what did I say was going on? ¬†First, I laid out two important dates for significant supply increases. ¬†The first, November 2014, won’t matter as much as the second, November 2015. ¬†Both are the month after greenhouse and full sun production harvest, and although it’s elementary the indoor growing culture here isn’t quite as familiar with seasonality as the outdoor growing culture it will have to become. ¬†We at CASP are working on projecting the October harvest but in the meantime, it doesn’t take a genius to recognize that once a good chunk of Tier 3s get a whole season in, we will be in for a supply glut.

What this means for I-502 licensees, particularly producers, is that they need to make the most of the current windfall prices and plan for price declines in the near future, not a few years. ¬†This will impact indoor producers most of all, since their costs of production are much higher than those of non-indoor producers. ¬†Electricity is the big ticket item, but there’s also the cost of real estate leases, dealing with urban building codes, and so forth. ¬†I’m convinced that the current stabilization of black market prices in California after a 2009-2011 free fall is entirely the result of indoor production getting squeezed out.

The other thing I addressed was current retail pricing, popularly thought of as too high.  Retail stores, I pointed out, were constantly running out of product and having to close.  From a neoclassical economic perspective, that means one thing:  prices are in fact too low, at $20-$25 a gram.  Why might that be?

According to my ethnographic interviews, retailers are worried about not being perceived as price gougers, and they are using current illegal and medical prices as a comparison. ¬†This means that they aren’t just taking market prices from producers: they are seeking below-market prices right now, often trading long-term supply contracts to get them. ¬†And it’s working, to some degree — smaller producers certainly see the benefit of exchanging windfall prices now for sourcing stability later, presumably when market prices fall below the approximately $8/g or $3K per wholesale lb such arrangements generally fall into.

On the other hand, most producers have been in the process so long that they are absolutely starving for revenue, whereas the retailers simply won a lottery ticket. ¬†They¬†need market prices to recapitalize their businesses and prepare for the future. ¬†Sure, some producer/processors seem especially rapacious, but from my interviews they, too, have been concerned about being perceived as price gougers. ¬†For them, however, $11/gram or $5K/lb seems much more fair — and probably is also below the true market price of legal cannabis right now.

Once I finished making these points, the audience stood up and made them again, to each other, and a conversation began. ¬†That’s where it’s got to go if the supply chain is to smooth out: retailers have to relax their definition of price gouging and producers have to provide product that retailers will have no problem paying a little more for. ¬†It was a true seminar moment for me, as someone who has led not a few of those in academic settings. ¬†By way of conclusion, I want to thank Mercedys McKnight for inviting me and Twicebaked in Washington for being a familiar friendly face in the audience, especially before the room filled up. ¬†That was a great experience for me!

 

CASP Presents: CBD It’s Time for a Conversation

 

From left to right:  Dr. Corva, Martin Lee, Alison Bigelow, Dr. Sexton, and Christopher Larson

From left to right: Dr. Corva, Martin Lee, Alison Bigelow, Dr. Sexton, and Christopher Larson

Photo by Doug McVay of Drug War Facts

Video by Steve Hyde

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

This year our signal contribution to the nation’s largest “protestival” was a Saturday Hemposium tent panel titled “CBD: it’s time for a conversation.” ¬†We are very honored to have one of Sonoma County’s finest, Martin Lee of Project CBD, presenting alongside one of Sohum’s finest, Christopher Larson of Lost Coast Botanicals; ¬†Dr. Michelle Sexton, CASP¬†Executive Medical Research Director and founder of Phytalab; and Alison Bigelow, Washington State CBD rich breeder and patient advocate.¬†for a 45 minute long conversation followed by Q&A. ¬†An introduction of sorts to the conversation can be had by visiting Fred Gardner’s piece¬†here, Michelle’s interview by Martin¬†here, a previous piece in the Ganjier¬†here, and an excellent essay by “William Breathes” over at Toke of the Town¬†here.

The purpose of this particular conversation was to put breeding, growing, extraction, analysis, and distribution knowledge together in one place in order to develop an agenda for CBD-rich cannabis medicine for patients that isn’t shaped by a political and economic agendas that have nothing to do with patients,¬†and to have that conversation in a forum for advancing the cannabis peace at large. ¬†The panel was carefully selected to include CASP¬†associates¬†who have been working with CBD rich cannabis in different capacities, and hence to be “interdisciplinary.” ¬†We were very privileged to have Fred Gardner, Martin Lee’s collaborator on both Project CBD and O’Shaughnessy’s, asking questions from¬†the audience.

My goal, as always, was to open up the conversation so that the public and policymakers could peek beyond the headline hype at the reality of CBD’s potential medical benefits. ¬†Here’s a tip: it works best in conjunction with, not separated from, other cannabinoids but especially THC. ¬†If you click on the primer links above you can get previously published, detailed analyses along these lines. ¬†However, those links won’t get you to the voice that has been heard least, but is just as significant as the others: that of Alison Bigelow.

Alison has a “Douglas Hiatt” collective garden, which in Washington means a garden that has stayed under the radar while others have opened up storefronts and sought the media spotlight. ¬†It is a nonprofit operation, with thin margins and small batch production, but embedded deeply in Seattle’s medical marijuana community. ¬†Her strain “Plum” was the strain around which¬†Dr. Sunil Aggarwal built his Ph.D. medical cannabis ethnography while we were in grad school together in the mid-00s. ¬†Since then she has been working with Ringo’s high CBD genetics and getting by, a situation made more difficult by how hard it is to accommodate lower-income patients while staying afloat.

This is one of the great paradoxes of CBD-rich markets right now: ¬†there is massive growing demand, very few suppliers, and the demand tends to be from lower income patients who couldn’t afford the true market price of high CBD medicine. ¬†Into the void has stepped opportunists, charlatans, and every combination of both, slinging industrial hemp sludge from China on Amazon and claiming that their strain somehow is the only CBD rich strain that works. The money made by the opportunists flows to states like Utah and Florida, where conservative legislators can feel comfortable promoting “CBD-only” legislation. ¬†Martin’s critique of this was, as usual for him, to the point: we are re-purposing the Reefer madness fear of THC by turning CBD into its “good” alternative, so we can safely reinforce the “badness” of THC. ¬†As all the panelists pointed out, patients and researchers are finding that strains that have a robust balance of cannabinoids are more effective as medicine for most conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

Report Card I-502: How is Legalization Going?

video by Steve Hyde

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

My first Hemposium panel for Hempfest 2014 brought together Don Skakie, Reverend Cannabis, Kevin Oliver, Shawn Denae and yours truly to report on how legalization is going. ¬†It was moderated by CASP Board member Don E. Wirtschafter, sort of, in a highly entertaining fashion. ¬†What’s missing from the beginning of this video is Don’s acknowledgement that he needed a moderator for his moderating, given his own frustrations with the licensing process; and that I should step in. ¬†We had discussed this previously in a slightly different context, so I was highly entertained by the way it played out. ¬†This was by far the most fun panel I’ve ever participated in, as a result.

The video captures Don’s introductory grievance, and before I can get a substitute moderation in Don Skakie — who is a really great guy — jumped in to talk about the alternative legislative initiative he was promoting to replace I-502. ¬†As the minutes ticked by without any reference to what was actually going on with legalization in this state, Shawn Denae and I plotted an intervention. ¬†Right when I was about to interrupt, he wound down his comments and I got us more focused by providing a 2 minute time limit for introductory comments and a request that we stick to the subject of the panel.

My own comments urged the crowd to think about each of the folks on the stage, including Don, as ethnographic examples of what was going on right now. Don’s frustrations are shared by many, but folks like Kevin Oliver, who is an approved Tier 3 producer, provide the examples we need to know about in order to understand the process as it is taking shape. ¬†I provided some of the analysis you can read on this site, while supplementing with more recent ethnographic context from Active and Approved retailers, producers, and processors.

I focused in particular on differences between retailers and producers concerning what constitutes a fair price. ¬†Many retailers I have spoken with are very concerned to provide a fair price to their customers, and as a result may view wholesale producer prices as too high. ¬†The producer/processors are also concerned to provide a fair price to retailers but for them, the sheer length of time since they’ve been able to produce revenue means that those prices are a bit higher — I would say not as high as the rational market price.

But the takeaway point is that there are lots of other factors determining price and availability of legal cannabis besides basic supply and demand. ¬†If there weren’t, retailers would be paying more for wholesale product from producer/processors and also charging more to legal consumers. ¬†If they did that they would be able to stay open because they wouldn’t be constantly running out. ¬†“Basic supply and demand” is therefore a limited explanatory framework for understanding how things are working now.

After taking a seat to cool down Don came back up and launched into another entertaining rant, and things got a little talk show on stage before Don asked us to assign a grade to the Washington State Liquor Control Board.  I finished by assigning a totally different grade than everyone else, and it might not be what you think.  Watch the video to find out what it was!

 

 

 

Map of Approved and Active Producers 8/5/2014

08102014_Producers

 

Map by Steve Hyde

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

I am pleased to publish Steve’s latest map, of the 150 or so producers that have been approved by the WSLCB, as of their 8/5 update. ¬†We have grayed out producers who have been approved less than 10 weeks ago. ¬†We realize some of those may be active, and apologize in advance. ¬†I will be updating this later with more analysis, but in the meantime please enjoy the map.

 

CASP T Shirts now available

CASP T Shirt

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

Just in time for Seattle Hempfest 2014, CASP T-shirts are now available with donations of $25 or more.  Please donate using the paypal button in the left-hand sidebar.

Men’s and women’s sizes S-XXL. ¬†If your size is out, please allow two weeks for us to catch up on inventory.

If you have already donated $25 or more, we plan on sending you a T-shirt as soon as you send us your gender and size!

Please enter your address to which you would like the T-shirt delivered in your paypal donation page.

All donations are 501c(3) tax deductible through our fiscal sponsor, Americans For Safe Acess Foundation (ASAF).

 

 

 

 

What is Light Dep?

ganjier

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

Since we’ve been critiquing the corporate media fixation on supply shortage and the notion that the WSLCB is not the only factor shaping I-502 compliant cannabis agriculture in Washington State, it might be a good idea to explore the cyclical nature of cannabis agriculture — and therefore the seasonality of prices — through one very effective strategy called “light dep” (short for light deprivation).

I would be a terrible “ganjier” if I was the one doing the explaining, since I’ve never actually done it myself. ¬†Instead, I invite readers to check out how it’s described by one of the sponsors of the Emerald Triangle’s first “Golden Tarp Award,” to be held September 13th, 2014 at the Mateel Center in Redway, California. ¬†Please welcome, as a CASP knowledge supplement:

What is Light Deprivation? by Jonathan Valdman of Forever Flowering at The Ganjier!

Additional information regarding¬†light dep can be found here, by “Wonderland Nursery.”

Washington State Retail: Who’s Open, When, and Where 8/7/2014

07292014_RETAIL_POINTS

Map by Steve Hyde and Steven Wan

by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

 

Legal Cannabis Retailer

Address

City

County

Phone

When Open

WESTSIDE420 RECREATIONAL

4503 OCEAN BEACH HWY STE 103

LONGVIEW

COWLITZ

3604235261

Th-Su 10-8

NEW VANSTERDAM

6515 E MILL PLAIN BLVD

VANCOUVER

CLARK

3605974739

Su-Th 11-9, F-Sa 11-10

420 CARPENTER

422 CARPENTER RD STE 105

LACEY

THURSTON

3604026368

Su-Sa 11-8

THE HAPPY CROP SHOPPE

50 ROCK ISLAND RD

EAST WENATCHEE

DOUGLAS

5098881597

M-Th 12-7, F-Sa 12-8

MAIN STREET MARIJUANA

2314 MAIN ST

VANCOUVER

CLARK

4259745804

M-Th 11-7, F-Sa 11-8, Su 11-6

TOP SHELF CANNABIS

3863 HANNEGAN RD

BELLINGHAM

WHATCOM

3602243735

M-Th 10-8, F-Sa 10-10

FRESH GREENS

29 HORIZON FLATS RD STE 8

WINTHROP

OKANOGAN

5099962025

M-Th 10-6, F 10-7, Sa 9-7

ALTITUDE

260 MERLOT DR

PROSSER

BENTON

5097864200

M-Th 2:30-6:30, F 1-8, Sa 11-7, Su 1-5

FREEDOM MARKET

820A WESTSIDE HWY

KELSO

COWLITZ

3603550682

M-Su 9-12am

CANNABIS CITY

2733 4TH AVE S 1st Floor

SEATTLE

KING

2066821332

M-Su 12-8

SPACE

3111 S PINE ST

TACOMA

PIERCE

2066508908

M-Su 10-10

VERDE VALLEY RETAIL SALES

4007 MAIN ST

UNION GAP

YAKIMA

5094203430

M-Su 10-10

WHIDBEY ISLAND CANNABIS CO

5826 S KRAMER RD STE A AND D

LANGLEY

ISLAND

3603216151

M-Su 10-10

GREEN COLLAR

10422 PACIFIC AVE S STE B

TACOMA

PIERCE

2532670675

M-Su 10-10

SPOKANE GREEN LEAF

9107 N COUNTRY HOMES BLVD STE B

SPOKANE

SPOKANE

5099196347

M-Sa 10-8:30, Su 10-7

CASCADE KROPZ

19129 SMOKEY POINT BLVD STE B

ARLINGTON

SNOHOMISH

3606595422

M-Sa 10-8

4US RETAIL

23251 HWY 20

OKANOGAN

OKANOGAN

3602240978

M-Sa 10-7

GREENSIDE

10600 MAIN ST

BELLEVUE

KING

2069103811

M-F 10-9, Sa-Su 10-7

2020 SOLUTIONS

2018 IRON ST STE A

BELLINGHAM

WHATCOM

3603938697

M-F 9-9, Sa 9-7, Su 11-6

HIGH TIME STATION

1448 BASIN ST NW SUITE A

EPHRATA

GRANT

5097541047

Out of Product

MARGIE’S POT SHOP

405 E STUEBEN

BINGEN

KLICKITAT

5094930441

Out of Product

420 HOLIDAY

2028 10TH AVE

LONGVIEW

COWLITZ

5093030681

09/01/14

GREEN THEORY

10697 MAIN ST STE B

BELLEVUE

KING

4255027033

09/01/14

HERBAL NATION

19302 BOTHELL EVERETT HWY

BOTHELL

SNOHOMISH

4254852535

08/18/14

CROCKPOT

1703 SE SEDGWICK RD STE 113

PORT ORCHARD

KITSAP

2533127280

08/10/14

SEA CHANGE CANNABIS

282332 HIGHWAY 101 STE 2

PORT TOWNSEND

JEFFERSON

2064228328

08/08/14

Sat 10-run out

When supply smooths out F-Sa 10-8; then 7 days a week 10-8

SATORI

9301 N DIVISION ST STE B-C

SPOKANE

SPOKANE

5099947051

08/08/14

MILL CREEK NATURAL FOODS

4315 MAIN ST STE A

UNION GAP

YAKIMA

5098400186

08/08/14

BUD HUT

1123 E STATE ROUTE 532

CAMANO ISLAND

ISLAND

3606293480

Not Yet

CREATIVE RETAIL MGMT

7046 PACIFIC AVE

TACOMA

PIERCE

2536917293

Not Yet

ELLENSBURG APOTHECARY

1516 WEST UNIVERSITY WAY

ELLENSBURG

KITTITAS

5098335556

August 23rd soft

August 25th grand

GREEN STAR CANNABIS

1403 N DIVISION ST STE A

SPOKANE

SPOKANE

5099193398

August 7 soft openingAugust 16 Grand Opening

M-Th 10-10; F-Sat 10-12am; Su 10-6

CASCADE HERB COMPANY

1240 E MAPLE ST STE 103

BELLINGHAM

WHATCOM

9082856086