[VIDEO] Filmmaker Mikal Jakubal discusses his film ONE GOOD YEAR with Seattle audience at CASP fundraiser

Thanks to everyone for joining CASP at New Freeway Hall last night – especially filmmaker Mikal Jakubal who shared with us the story of family farming Humboldt style. ONE GOOD YEAR is a film about people who plant marijuana and grow a community. We have prepared a video of the Q&A with Mikal held after the screening.

If you would like to make a contribution to CASP – please use the donate button in the column menu to the left. Thank you.

See you in Southern Oregon tomorrow!

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by Dominic Corva, Executive Director

Special thanks to Steve Hyde, Joy Beckerman, Naz Victoria, Rachel Kurtz, Don Wirtschafter, Michelle Sexton, New Freedom Hall, and of course documentary filmmaker Mikal Jakubal for putting together our screening of One Good Year last night! ¬†Next up: Dr. Corva goes to Southern Oregon to meet the Oregon SunGrown Grower’s Guild, organized by the fabulous Kaitrin Arnold!

 

 

 

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Update on Spokane County Organizing

WANORML

by Crystal Oliver, Washington NORML

After a Spokane County Planning Commission Hearing held last Thursday the county is now considering more restrictive zoning on Marijuana producers as well as prohibiting outdoor production.

Public comment is being accepted for the next 3 days at jpederson@spokanecounty.org
in the subject line please write “comment for the record on amendment 14-ZTA-03″.

Ask that this amendment be adopted as it is currently written and explain why you support marijuana businesses and farms being allowed to open and operate with minimal restrictions in Spokane County.

Please share and take action if you’re in Spokane county and support legal marijuana!

County Voting on Advisory Vote #8

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Map Source: http://results.vote.wa.gov/results/current/Advisory-Votes-Advisory-Vote-No-8-Senate-Bill-6505-Concerns-marijuana-excise-tax_ByCounty.html

 

By Dr. Jim MacRae, CASP Research Associate

Counties that chose, on Advisory Vote #8, the option to MAINTAIN the restrictions imposed by SB-6505 on common benefits and tax exemptions available to the remainder of Washington’s agricultural businesses tend to cluster in the Northwest portion of the State and are joined by Clark and Whitman Counties.

The negative correlation apparent in the following graph demonstrates that Counties voting for the legalization of recreational cannabis in 2012 have now expressed a preference to maintain the exclusion of common agricultural benefits and tax exemptions delineated in SB-6505.

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MAINTAINING SB-6505 increases the production costs (and, in many cases, processor costs) of recreational cannabis. Given this, one might have reasonably expected to see less desire to maintain SB-6505 in areas that are on record as supporting the legalization of recreational cannabis. This is clearly not the case.

 

Perhaps this reflects enduring support for one of the original selling points behind I-502: the supply of new tax revenues to our State. Those favoring SB-6505 as one that eliminates tax exemptions to I-502 businesses may not wish to see the promised tax revenues they voted for in 2012 be compromised.

Conversely, those wishing to repeal SB-6505 as something that dramatically increases the cost of production of recreational cannabis (in a manner further compounded by the the multiple levels of subsequent excise tax) may well have realized that maintaining SB-6505 will increase both the cost of recreational cannabis to the consumer, and the difficulty of running a profitable I-502 business.

Cultural Geography of WA State Cannabis Consumption (based on BOTEC study)

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Map by Steve Hyde

Research by Dr. Jim MacRae

by Dominic Corva

This map, created from data produced by BOTEC for the Washington State Liquor Control Board, shows how the WSLCB understood the cultural geography of cannabis consumption by county level in Washington State as they embarked upon their rule-making process.  This information was used to calculate canopy limits and allocate retail stores to jurisdictions a year ago.

The purpose of creating this map is two fold: first, to help the public and policymakers understand how cultural geography shapes bureaucratic rulemaking; and second, to help the public and policy makers understand better how cannabis market consumption (not just legal consumption) is unevenly distributed throughout the state.

This “one-map story” is the first in an ongoing series aimed at helping people understand the geography of cannabis policy landscapes, one digestible bit at a time. ¬†More complex analyses depend upon understanding how all the stories fit together, but the following paragraphs provide starting points for such analyses.

First, there is a clear East/West relationship may map, to some extent, onto existing state political geographies: conservative/liberal; rural/urban; and to the I-5 corridor which extends south of the border but also north of the border.  We could look further at the first two by finding existing county-level maps, but the third requires a little more thought.

While I-90 is a major East-West corridor, it does not lead through major urban consumption areas. The North-South corridor leads to and through Vancouver, Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, and Eugene; from Eugene to the south is the cannabis agricultural breadbaskets of Southern Oregon and Northern California. It’s also the major historical corridor for hippie migration from the Bay Area at the end of the 1960s.

We can also say with weak confidence (given data limitations and methodological challenges) that there appear to be¬†five anomalous counties: ¬†Three of them (Whatcom, Skagit, and Clallam) are in the Northwest of the state, where lots of intentional communities sprang up in the 1970s. ¬†We also note that southwest British Colombia may have stronger cultural geographies of consumption that Washington state. Grey’s Harbor is on the Peninsula not far from where Ed Rosenthal outed the first commercial indoor grow he’d ever seen in a 1987 Whole Earth Catalog article; and Ferry county in the northeast may share some combination of the Northwest cannabis consumption geographies as well as being a historical corridor for BC cannabis entering the U.S. (this all-but¬†ended after 2001).

One map stories root our geographical investigations by showing us spatial relationships that must be further explained.  Look forward to more on a regular basis!

 

 

[Photo Essay] State-Legal Sun-grown Production in Washington State

WSLCB licensed Tier 2 and 3 cannabis farms clustered together in North Central Washington State

WSLCB licensed Tier 2 and 3 cannabis farms clustered together in North Central Washington State

North Central Washington State-legal Sungrown Cannabis

North Central Washington State-legal Sungrown Cannabis

Cannabis understory.  State-Legal Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis understory. State-Legal Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis understory.  State-Legal Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis understory. State-Legal Washington, Autumn 2014

Local workers tending to state-legal cannabis, Washington, Autumn 2014

Local workers tending to state-legal cannabis, Washington, Autumn 2014

State-Legal Cannabis, Washington, Autumn 2014

State-Legal Cannabis, Washington, Autumn 2014

State-legal cannabis Washington.  Autumn 2014

State-legal cannabis Washington. Autumn 2014

State-Legal Cannabis, Washington, Sutumn 2014

State-Legal Cannabis, Washington, Sutumn 2014

Cannabis processing at a sun-grown tier 3 production farm in North Central Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis processing at a sun-grown tier 3 production farm in North Central Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis processing at a sun-grown tier 3 production farm in North Central Washington, Autumn 2014

Cannabis processing at a sun-grown tier 3 production farm in North Central Washington, Autumn 2014

Autumn colors at the first state-legal sungrown season, Washington  2014

Autumn colors at the first state-legal sungrown season, Washington 2014

Autumn colors at the first state-legal sungrown season, Washington  2014

Autumn colors at the first state-legal sungrown season, Washington 2014